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20121001
20121031
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 196 (some duplicates have been removed)
the governments and the companies between the two sides. as the largest economy in the u.s., california boasts the resources and a strong advantage in high tech, bio-science, agriculture, fisheries, and the forestry, and even tourism. and in terms of cooperation with china, california enjoys exceptional economic, cultural, and geographical locations and advantages. it is always is the gateway of the united states to china. as the economic and trade cooperation between china and the united states and california deepens, now we believe that trade and investment keeps growing. china is the third largest export destination for california. many multinationals like hp, intel, cisco, and chevron are doing well in china. they're making money in china. at the same time, as the close relationship is going on, many chinese companies are working in san francisco in california. i would like to name a few. the tsl, ciuts, just to name a few. these are successful chinese companies working here. as the american companies in china, the chinese companies working in california in san francisco are also making co
of the things they did, they have this incredible group of women who are traveling to the u.s. from various countries who worked in the areas of domestic violence and human trafficking in their countries, from greece, turkey, doorjageorgia. we want to welcome you with open arms to the city of san francisco. they're traveling with the u.s. state department and they are over at the iee table. welcome to san francisco. [applause] they helped make this a truly international conference. our keynote speaker is coming to us from that group. rose is going to introduce our keynote speaker. >> i would like to welcome the project manager of the shelter for women accident prostitution in iceland. she has built her career as an active proponent of women's issues in iceland. she previously served as director of the national committee for -- [applause] to >> hello, everyone. thank you so much for having us here today. we are honored to be with you. on the international women's day, i always feel like i have to say thank you. i want to thank all of the women who paved the way. i am grateful for having the
neighborhood of seattle, washington. his parents immigrated to the u.s. from china and the 1930's. his father fought in world war ii and worked as a cook. he passed away when the mayor was 15. his mother was a seamstress and a waitress. mayor lee has five siblings, he graduated from college in maine, he also went to uc- berkeley law school and finished in 1978. he and his wife have two daughters. i also want to mention, prior to becoming mayor, one of the key points in his contributions to the community is after he completed law school, he worked as a managing attorney for the san francisco asian law caucus, where he was an advocate for affordable housing and the rights of immigrants and renters. mayor lee -- [applause] >> thank you. welcome to city hall. the people's city hall, san francisco. i want you all to note that that was such a wonderful rendition of our national anthem. please give another applause to the millennium -- melanie and her daughter. i am so excited about all of you and seen so many of you from all over our state. come to city hall anin san francisco, welcome. i would lik
this morning on the green ship of our u.s. navy. it's very appropriate that it be here heading the fleet in san francisco. admiral beeman, thank you very much for your leadership. it is impressive what we are accomplishing. just two years ago, we started with an understanding that our military, the coast guard, the u.s. navy, the marine corps, had something that we really needed. it's called logistics expertise. and we recognized that and with the help of our fleet week association, with the help of our honorary chair, former secretary of state george scholtz, along with senator feinstein who started fleet week, we began to appreciate in addition to appreciating the men and women in uniform and the wonderful attributes of having fleet week and the blue angels and the parade of ships, we could also be working on something very important to this city. all across the world there are examples after example and i know the men and women and leadership of the uss macon know this after their tour of duty these past months, all over the world there are disasters and emergencies that we are res
, we'll have that facility about 14 years and we'll be welcoming 40 members from the u.s. marine corps, 20 members from the u.s. navy, 10 members the u.s. coast guard, where we will then partner with them and cross train them and use our techniques, reaching technical rescue and high and low rescue being demonstrated in display. we will also be having some of our u.s. navy personnel on ride-alongs with members on our ambulances, fire engines and trucks to continue with our cross training. so, it gives me great pride to be here to continue to serve as the fire chief, to welcome the military, and to say thank you to all of you. here's to an enjoyable fun-filled busy weekend. all the best, and thank you for your service. (applause) >> i wanted chief to tell you about that training. we first did it in 2010, search and rescue which we knew was a problem in haiti in the earth wake in the recovery. and like they say in san francisco, the fire department, we know how to do it, but when the big earthquake hits, we're all going to be victims and we want to make sure that anybody that potentially
was the identification of the lead federal agency for us. it was u.s. aid. what they provided for us was an avenue for funding. for direct contact with the government of japan. direct contact with the u.s. embassy. what that does, it helps to establish policy and guidance. for those who are looking at ways to now think of these sorts of operations as case studies in which you can test your ideas with the state of california and how you would respond, i would strongly endorsed that you look at policy and guidance. that is something that cannot be assumed away. as you go from the local level to the municipal level, then the state level, and where you plug in with the federal government, this for assumption that we are on the same page and working off the same set of standards is something on which i reach out. to the extent that we were dealing with a contaminated, radiological environment, it was important to have a nuclear regulatory commission. it plugged into the washington, dc environment. the technical expertise that resided in the department of energy. working closely with the government of j
the women. so we created the female engagement team. with our interagency partners, the u.s. department of state, danish and british governments and of course the afghans, additionally we reached out to the private sector for partnerships, and not for profits to deliver things that we weren't capable of delivering or to cover gaps that arose as we implemented the plan. we implemented the plan through 17 teams through helman and our two female engagement teams. this is actually just scrolling pictures. sometimes a picture says a thousand words and i don't want to take you down the whole history of a year but i wanted to talk to you about how we framed this plan. this plan was framed into 5 pillars and the 5 pillars were students and parents, we attempted to build buy in and assure safety among the students. there was lots of fear of reprisals. by sending your kids to school there was fear that the taliban was going to knock on your door and let you know that that wasn't allowed. previously the taliban had instituted a medrossas so their only forms of education were religious schools
>>> my name is chris stevens, i'm the new u.s. ambassador to libya. i had the honor to serve as the envoy to the libyan revolution and i was thrilled to watch the libyan people stand up and demand their rights. now i'm excited to return to libya to continue the great work we've started, building a solid partnership between the united states and libya to help you the libyan people achieve your goals. right now i'm in washington, preparing for my assignment. as i walk around the monuments and memorials commemorating the courageous men and women that made america what it is, i'm reminded we too went through challenging periods, when america was divided by a bitter civil war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. si
piece. this is the bill largest darkroom in the u.s.. >> there are a lot of people that want to get into that dark room. >> i think it is the heart of this place. you feel it when you come in. >> the people who just started taking pictures, so this is really an intersection for many generations of photographers and this is a great place to learn because if you need people from different areas and also everyone who works here is working in photography. >> we get to build the community here. this is different. first of all, this is a great location. it is in a less-populated area. >> of lot of people come here just so that they can participate in this program. it is a great opportunity for people who have a little bit of photographic experience. the people have a lot, they can really come together and share a love and a passion. >> we offer everything from traditional black and white darkrooms to learning how to process your first roll of film. we offer classes and workshops in digital camera, digital printing. we offer classes basically in the shooting, ton the town at night, treasur
in the past, have never had an account, or are not a u.s. citizen, bank on s.f. makes it easy for you to have an account. >> many people do not have a bank account because they might be in the check system, which means they had an account in the past but had problems managing it and it was closed. that gives them no option but to go to a cash -- check catcher for up to seven years. you want to give these people second chance. >> to find account best for you, follow these three easy steps. first, find a participating bank or credit union. call 211 or call one of our partner banks or credit unions and ask about the bank on s.f. account. both -- most bridges will have a sign in their window. second, ask about opening an account through bank on s.f.. a financial partner will guide you through this process and connect you with the account that is best for you. third, bring some form of identification. the california id, for an id, or your passport is fine. >> now you have open your account. simple? that is exactly why it was designed. you can access your account online, set up direct deposit, and
on government data, you know, examples all over the place. if you look at the era in which the u.s. government opened up weather data. and not only did it have profound effect on public safety when there are storms coming and agriculture and some of the others, it just provides and helped the quality of life in a profound way, the global positioning system and... almost every night created, 100,000 in economic value. incredible opportunities for doing this in job creation and safety and quality of life and really improving the lives of americans. so it did develop the strategies of 30-plus page document to the agencies of government that they have to work up the data and they have to make this stuff available in the way that we collect it, and use it and public information should remain public and we are going to drive that forward. >> there are a lot of things in the strategy around and the use of mobile government and how we summarize the... and think about the 21st century government in that way. and the policy that launched a couple of weeks ago and so much more is being formed that i thin
and gentlemen, mayor ed lee. [ applause ] >> hello everybody ! >> hello. ?2<&8.k,vr u.s. attorney melinda haigh for that wonderful introduction and richard carranza and mr. hirsch, but the no. 1 thing we care about you, we care about and your future and where you are going. when you get out of school being san franciscoans we'll have the best jobs in the world waiting for you. everyone one of you, how about that for san francisco? [ applause ] all right. well, let me start out by saying we're here in herbs theater. you have to know this is a special place. this is an historic landmark events place in san francisco. in 1945 the united nations charter was signed right here where you are sitting. it's the site where mayors like myself and others have addressed the annual state of the city address and it's a landmark place and that is why we choose to be here today with you. because we're making a big landmark to be antibullying across the country and we're launching it right here in san francisco with all of you. that is how important this is. and it's important also that the city family co
this morning. but it was extremely beneficial to not only the u.s. navy and marine corps, but to the international community. >> thank you. another hand? >> [inaudible] my experience with the haiti response. in this casey i was working at the deputy principal committee level and working at the white house. but it was really the first opportunity for this administration to work with a very complex response, and then recognizing for us the supported commander was usaid that normally isn't in the emergency response business. so, it was an educational process of how to move forces and yet support usaid and the role of the country team and port au prince. so, it was very informative there. and to back up when we had the first no fooling hurricane that worked its way up the entire gulf coast, the principal committee calls that were generated during the haiti response were then turned around and then bringing all of the governors into a conference call with the president to make sure that all their needs were being met in the advance of a hurricane arrival. so, we really had all
abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland. john de miranda, executive director, national association on alcohol, drugs and disability inc. and president and chief executive officer, stepping stone of san diego, san diego, california. dr. barbara l. kornblau, j.d., disabilities attorney and professor, school of health professions and studies, university of michigan-flint, flint, michigan. ed hammett, consumer advocate, marbury, maryland. dr. clark, how many people in the united states have a disability? that number is not exactly clear, but we estimate roughly 53 million people have a disability, and it may be larger because, again, it turns on new classification schema. but at least 53 million. john, how do we define a disability? well, a disability is really kind of a legal and an administrative term. and in some quarters you might be considered disabled, but by another jurisdiction you might not be considered disabled. but i use the term, often, physical sensory, cognitive, and developmental disability to really c
about my background. i am a naturalized u.s. citizen. i was born in ecuador. i came to the bay area, went to stanford university, and have a master's degree in structural engineering which i obtained in 1981, started my own structural engineering firm in 1988, santos and urrutia engineers. my partner is somebody that i met at stanford university. albert is a native san franciscan that attended the san francisco community college. there is a program where if you take 28 units and you get 3.65 and above, you have a direct path to uc-berkeley for better, stanford. [laughter] i forgot this was being televised. [laughter] i met albert and we started the firm in 1988. that is 25 years ago. we employed over 25 people. quite a few of them, members of this city college. let me tell you, we hear a lot of negative things about the community college. but i must assure you, that in terms of technical expertise and great educators, we have absolutely the best teachers in the nation. [applause] i can guarantee you we will be preserving them. i have, behind me, my wonderful family, my wife jenny, m
of your u.s. products. they weren't too keen on that. we think the europeans are crazy. opi has fun names like i am not really a waitress red. we decided to do a spoof and we came up with our own names, like i can't believe it is a carcinogen. we dressed up with sashes that said mistreatment. this all happened in may, by august the company announced they were taking out formaldehyde and now advertising all of their products are free of those chemicals. >> [applause]. >> that was a huge victory and it show that is we can change the industry, they are responsive and they can change on a dime relatively quickly. we have products and they work wonderfully and the prices didn't go. there is an initial resistance, we see it is possible to change this industry and happening very quickly. so i want to commend everybody that has worked on that and everybody who has chosen to think about the research and what they are using. one last reading from the book, this theme and what is possible to do together. this is the- chapter of my book, extreme make over, we need to give the beauty industry, u.s. go
was the hardest job i ever had, and the most important. brought to you by the u.s. department of health and human services. [music] you do not have to be in recovery to be an effective counselor, i want to make that clear. however, the fact that i am in recovery, and i've been counseling for over 30 years, it helps me because when i share and self-disclose with people who are sitting there filled with shame and guilt and remorse, and they don't understand that they're sick, and that they have a disease. when i share with them that i've walked that walk, i've walked in their shoes, i know what it's like, and i know that you can walk through it, they really listen. they really pay attention. because they look at me and say, if she could do it, i can do it. so, gary, let's continue. is employment a critical factor in the whole scheme of recovery? we say in the mental health field that work is the key to recovery. and building what, what dave said about substance abuse, many of the same themes you'll see there, in terms of, of giving people a sense of self-worth, a sense of direction. what are you go
week. it's on our website, fleet week.u.s. you'll see all the events including the opportunity to go down to marina green to see what we call humanitarian assistance village. and there the military demonstrates the kind of capabilities they have to do humanitarian assistance, including bringing water out of the pier -- out of the bay, purifying it and they'll hand you a cup of it and you can see how it tastes. but anyway, we're really looking forward to it and we thank all of you so much for your help and your contribution to make fleet week a big success. (applause) >> thank you, general maya. i can't tell you how much i've learned about maritime operations since i've been involved with fleet week and the complexities of bringing in all of these ships. we have american navy ships, united states navy ships, we have canadian ships coming in, coast guard ships. they all have to be put somewhere. and working out those complexities are the folks at the san francisco port. i'd like to call up monique moya. (applause) >> well, thank you. good morning, everyone, and thank you for coming. th
happen after the election, regardless of who should win, the broader u.s. economy does move forward? if we can get the u.s. economy out of second gear, we have seen the broader housing market turn and we're beginning to see the foundations of some job-growth. if the economy can pick up more broadly, what that would mean for san francisco, given the foundation that we have set for us today? clearly looking forward we think the physical boundaries of what is downtown will change. the type of space the tenants want will change. we think that this is a very good time for san francisco. we live in an exceptional time. and i'm going to paraphrase ever so slightly, but as jerry speyer would say, don't screw it up. [ laughter ] i feel very fortunate to work in this environment, to work for a great company and most importantly to get to work with all of you everyday. thank you very much. [ applause ] >> thank you, carl. now we're going to move from the talk about the tech explosion to one of our most significant economic generators, which is the hospitality industry and i think we're going
. my grandfather used to work for the school board. my dad is on the u.s. supreme court and so i believe that the pinnacle of a person's career is to make an impact on public service and when you see faith in our system of government dropping off a cliff, like it has, going from 80 percent to 20 percent, you see, something is wrong. something is not working. and when you have politics as usual, in sacramento, not being honest, not being transparent, not dealing with the problems and challenges of the future, we say that we have to change that. and so i want to bring that independent perspective, and that personal honesty and that willingness to invest in the things that are important for our future and being able to reform, status quo which is dysfunctional. and so i ask you for your vote, i ask for your support and i ask you to go to www.elect michael bryere.com and we are challenging the politics as usual. so thank you, again. >> i would like to sincerely thank both of you for participating on behalf of myself, the league of women voters of san francisco and our partner organiz
believe that the u.s. navy is capable of maintaining that unambiguous military strength. as we sit here this morning aboard the uss macon island, in san francisco bay, looking out to the pacific, it is easy to believe that the united states is, in fact, a pacific power and that to keep it that way we will maintain the best damn navy in the world. thank you very much. (applause)speaker .... >> now i'm going to introduce our next speaker, major general melvin spee splt e i've known melvin for a number of years, obviously we served together in the marine corps. i can tell you he's been with fleet week for 3 years now and the one thing about mel, he's got a lot of ideas and he accepts no as an interim answer because a lot of things that he wanted to do to make fleet week better originally the answer from authorities was no. and he made some amazing things happen just through his will. a commander can will things to happen. and i really want to thank you, mel, for that whole peer to peer medical exchange was your idea and it was just a huge hit and i thank you so much for that. he's offe
. we had urban search and rescue, u.s. coast guard, and this provided an opportunity for our military to work with the federal and state partners there in learning how to interact with their agencies and also being able to learn some of the different capabilities that they have in using their equipment. we also had some medical partners there where they were able to locate and evacuate the medical patients and that also showed a great partnership. this is the health care association for hawaii and this is the part of the agency that helped us coordinate the medical response part of this. they were able to conduct a 50-bed disaster medical assistance team hospital on the island of oahu and this allowed the state of hawaii to be able to exercise their state-wide disaster drill. one of the things that hawaii has never been able to do is to be able to practice together in one live exercise. they have all of their processes, how they're going to respond in a local disaster situation, but they have never been able to really put that to use. and being able to partner with us during the ri
, and hopefully it will not be the last. without further ado, ladies and gentlemen, the commander of the u.s. pacific fleet, admiral patrick walsh. [applause] he >> thank you. and thank you for the opportunity to join you here today. what a privilege to be able to follow the table top exercise discretion and the presentation of remarks by the governor. as i think about the work that you are embarked on and the type of steps that you would like to take in the continuum of preparation for natural disasters and the response that you would take as responsible officials, think of the next presentation as an opportunity for a case study. think about the questions that leaders need to answer in times of crisis. what will be unique and different about our discussion in this operation was that this was not one singular event. it was a series of cascading crises, aggravated by hundreds and then eventually thousands of aftershocks. it is continually challenged those who were in positions of responsibility in ways -- in complex areas that were very, very hard to anticipate. i think one question that is
perspective down at camp pendleton as the active for the. u.s. northern command have been tasked to (inaudible) defense support to civil authority concept plans. with that, there is a recommendation to integrate and synchronize dod planning with federal, regional and state partners, something that san francisco fleet week has energized in the bay area over the past 3 years. the establishment of the dual status commander helps us pull title 10 and title 32 forces together in a more synchronized dod response. the new attention and focus by dod is only part of the puzzle, though. dod success in helping in response to a disaster will ultimately be determined by civil authorities and their ability to properly plan their initial response and then the means by which dod capabilities are requested and properly employed. we know dod is in support of civil authorities and the real burden to that effective support is going to be sound planning to ensure we're properly directed and we can best benefit or provide benefit to the need of the place where we're supporting. the guidance now bein
five green contractors in the u.s. and longtime sponsor returning again is oakland law firm wendell, rosen, black, and dean. this firm -- we have a lot of long standing firms here. more than 100 years in oakland. continues to be a leader here and throughout the bay area. attorneys have played a role in many construction projects, commercial and residential development and business deals that have helped shape this community. they remind you of the importance of having a complete set of legal tools at your disposal, and the firm hit -- helps a bay area leaders litigation across multiple disciplines. land use, environmental, corporate, i.t., technology, bankruptcy, estate planning -- you got it, they are there for you. thank you. many thanks to our partner in associations to help promote this event. san francisco chamber of commerce, san francisco's center for economic development, oakland metropolitan chamber of commerce, spur, emeryville chamber of commerce, and east bay eba. thank you for partnering with us. i know i will miss some of you, but let me extend a welcome to the public
from spain, some of them with the spanish royal armies; other irish influx arrived from the u.s. for the construction of railroads used to transport sugar cane to the sugar plantations. that was at the end of the 19th century. and then at the beginning of the 20th century, we're talking 1902, 1910, before odono that i mentioned before, this man who gave his name to -- he was very proud of this lighthouse. the cubans offer hospitality to general alexander alejandro o'reilly. he rose through the ranks of the spanish army. the spanish sent alexander o'reilly to cuba to form a militia. he was appointed governor of louisiana and head of the army later on. he arrived in august, 1769, and took formal possession of louisiana for spain. think of new orleans and cuba, in particular havana, governors there were also in cuba so there was all this traveling from one city to another because later when i got my ph.d. from tulaine university and i went to the irish channel. it's interesting, the irish history connected with new orleans. so the o'reilly family has been in louisiana for centuries
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 196 (some duplicates have been removed)